Tag Archives: mental health

Forest Bathing

 

Forest Therapy, also known as
Shinrin-Yoku,”

refers to the practice of spending time in forested areas for the purpose of enhancing health, wellness, and happiness. The practice follows the general principle that it is beneficial to spend time bathing in the atmosphere of the forest. The Japanese words translate into English as “Forest Bathing.”

How do might you do it?

Enter the forest with an intent to have a direct, uninterrupted, immersive engagement.

arboretum lawn

Cross the threshold into the forest and acknowledge the ceremonial honor of entering the home of gracious beings.

baldwin lake shoreline

Take time to become aware of yourself, your body, and what your senses are perceiving

Begin to take notice of each impression you have as it occurs

baldwin lake side cottage

Move slowly through the forest as you observe everything else that is moving around you

lakeside palm

Explore aspects of the forest that enable you to have an intimate appreciation for what you find by connecting with your senses

water feature

Sit and discover what has been revealed to you

phoenix

close your visit with a ceremony before crossing the threshold as you depart

 

“The problem with our busy city lives, however, is that the stressful events keep piling up.  There will be emails to answer, co-workers demanding attention, a deadline looming, the shopping to get done, the bills to be paid.  And our cortisol levels remain always slightly raised.

When cortisol is released constantly, it can disrupt all our body’s processes. And people who produce chronically high levels of cortisol are at increased risk of numerous health problems.”

Dr. Qing Li

Forest Bathing, pgs. 66-67

autumn autumn mood colorful edge of the woods
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

the semicolon project

A semi-colon is a reminder to pause and then keep going.

hpwritesblogs

FullSizeRender-1FullSizeRender Today I went to a tattoo artist, and for $60 I let a man with a giant Jesus-tattoo on his head ink a semi-colon onto my wrist where it will stay until the day I die. By now, enough people have started asking questions that it made sense for me to start talking, and talking about things that aren’t particularly easy.

We’ll start here: a semi-colon is a place in a sentence where the author has the decision to stop with a period, but chooses not to. A semi-colon is a reminder to pause and then keep going. 

In April I was diagnosed with depression and anxiety. By the beginning of May I was popping anti-depressents every morning with a breakfast I could barely stomach. In June, I had to leave a job I’d wanted since I first set foot on this campus as an incoming freshmen because of my mental…

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Mental Toughness

By taking a little time each week to apply good advice, we can make life changing progress.

Ajoobacats Blog

There are many ways to get mentally tougher apparently, but according to licensed marriage and family therapist Claire Dorotik-Nana there are five things we can all stop doing right now that will promote our mental robustness:

1. Stop Off Loading Responsibility. Take responsibility for your actions, thoughts and feelings. No one makes us feel or act a certain way, we all make choices.
2. Stop Taking Things Personally. Realise no one is out to get us and that the world is not against us.
3. Stop Forecasting. Stop wasting time thinking about, forecasting or predicting the future.
4. Let Go Of Illusions. Accept there will be good and bad and things will not just work out in your favour always.
5. Stop Holding On To The Past. Letting go of the past means facing losses, but it also means finding opportunities available to us now.

I have taken the time…

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My Brain on Trauma

This is a case of how harm keeps on harming. Please prevent harm whenever you can.

Beating Trauma

SwimMeet

I love to swim. I always have. It was healing for me. When I was in the water, nobody could get to me. Nobody could hurt me. I was in my own world, a world that flowed, a world where all the darkness and pain of my reality was far away. The physical pain stopped too. The aching in my shoulders, hips and knees didn’t weigh me down when I was in the water. The buoyancy was just what my beat-up body needed. And it helped that I was good, very good at swimming. I knew how to flow through that water. I knew how to win.

Fast forward to my own little family and it is predictable that I want to continue that swimming experience vicariously. Unlike many parents who dread long swim meets, I don’t. I breathe in chlorine like some breathe in a field of flowers. It…

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