Category Archives: Forest Bathing

Doctors Prescription: Nature

www.pbs.org/newshour/show/why-doctors-are-increasingly-prescribing-nature

As rates of chronic disease among children have skyrocketed over the past few decades, pediatricians have increasingly looked for solutions beyond the clinic. Sometimes that means actually prescribing time outside. Special correspondent Cat Wise reports from Oakland on the medical evidence that indicates escaping modern urban life, even temporarily, can yield health dividends.

Through walks in the woods, UW-La Crosse professor taps into nature’s healing powers | Education | lacrossetribune.com

The children stood shoulder to shoulder under the towering trees, their eyes closed, their mouths open, their senses tuned to the forest around them.
— Read on lacrossetribune.com/content/tncms/live/

The ANFT Way of Forest Therapy

Important information about why forest therapy with a guide has far reaching potential for everyone.

Contents include an overview of Forest Therapy, a description of some of the emerging issues in the forest therapy field, a transparent discussion of the business aims of ANFT, and the Scope of Practice and Professional Standards upon which the ANFT Guide Training and Certification Program is built.
— Read on view.joomag.com/the-anft-way-of-forest-therapy-the-anft-way-of-forest-therapy/0822982001561584510

Forest bathing: What it is and why you should try it – Thrive

The Japanese practice of forest bathing — or shinrin-yoku — may result in some impressive health benefits. Here’s what you need to know.

These days, we stay indoors for hours scrolling through social media, binge-watching TV shows, or playing video games. We shop online and have purchases delivered straight to our homes. We live in or commute to cities surrounded by concrete, steel, and smog. Our days are mostly spent away from sunshine, trees, water, and fresh air.

While our modern way of life can be convenient, it’s taking us away from the health benefits of nature. To the point where getting outside should now be a priority. This is where the Japanese practice of shinrin-yoku — or forest bathing — can help.

What is forest bathing?

In 1982, the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries created the term shinrin-yoku, which translates to “forest bathing” or “absorbing the forest atmosphere.” The practice encourages people to simply spend time in nature — no actual bathing required. It’s also very low impact, which means you don’t have to go for trail runs or do an intense hike. The goal of forest bathing is to live in the present moment while immersing your senses in the sights and sounds of a natural setting.

— Read on thrive.kaiserpermanente.org/thrive-together/live-well//forest-bathing-try

Forest Bathing

 

Forest Therapy, also known as
Shinrin-Yoku,”

refers to the practice of spending time in forested areas for the purpose of enhancing health, wellness, and happiness. The practice follows the general principle that it is beneficial to spend time bathing in the atmosphere of the forest. The Japanese words translate into English as “Forest Bathing.”

How do might you do it?

Enter the forest with an intent to have a direct, uninterrupted, immersive engagement.

arboretum lawn

Cross the threshold into the forest and acknowledge the ceremonial honor of entering the home of gracious beings.

baldwin lake shoreline

Take time to become aware of yourself, your body, and what your senses are perceiving

Begin to take notice of each impression you have as it occurs

baldwin lake side cottage

Move slowly through the forest as you observe everything else that is moving around you

lakeside palm

Explore aspects of the forest that enable you to have an intimate appreciation for what you find by connecting with your senses

water feature

Sit and discover what has been revealed to you

phoenix

close your visit with a ceremony before crossing the threshold as you depart

 

“The problem with our busy city lives, however, is that the stressful events keep piling up.  There will be emails to answer, co-workers demanding attention, a deadline looming, the shopping to get done, the bills to be paid.  And our cortisol levels remain always slightly raised.

When cortisol is released constantly, it can disrupt all our body’s processes. And people who produce chronically high levels of cortisol are at increased risk of numerous health problems.”

Dr. Qing Li

Forest Bathing, pgs. 66-67

autumn autumn mood colorful edge of the woods
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